STUDENT HANDBOOK

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Dress Code
Homework Policy
Student Parking
Recreational Devices
Guidance
Lockers

Cafeteria
Alternative School
Medications
Tobacco Usage
Confidentiality of Records

Student Records
Grading Scale

Absence From School Activities

Parent Communication

Textbooks

School Bus Regulations

Fire Drills

Telephones

Who Owns the School?

Rights and Responsibilities

Assemblies

School Spirit

Extra Curricular Activities

After-School Detention
Credits

Selection of Honor Graduates
Safe School Helpline & Student Code Of Conduct
Student Discipline Procedures
Attendance Policy

LOGAN COUNTY SCHOOLS School Violence Policy
Home/Hospital Instruction Policy

Logan County Policies

LOGAN COUNTY SCHOOLS'

STUDENT DRESS CODE

    The Logan County Board of Education believes that its major concern is the safety and well-being of the students of Logan County, and to provide every child with an appropriate environment for a thorough and efficient education.

    Therefore, the development of a policy on dress code is for the protection of the health and safety of the students and to remove any distractions or obstacles from the daily educational process.

    Since there is a direct relationship between dress and behavior, it is believed that students and staff should dress appropriately for the school setting. Appropriate, will be defined here as right and correct for the school setting and functions, conducive to learning, and shall not distract from or be disruptive to the learning process.

    Logan County School students should always be neat and clean in their dress and appearance. It is expected that each student will maintain a proper mode of dress, both during the school day and at all school activities. If in the judgment of the administration, a student is dressed inappropriately, the student will be required to change clothes or cover up inappropriate clothing before returning to classes. Time out of class will be regarded as unexcused. Additional measures may be taken if deemed necessary by the administration. The administration has the final authority on all matters relating to the dress code.

Dress Code

Student dress and grooming should be in good taste and appropriate for the occasion.

Sunglasses are not to be worn in the classroom unless a medical permit is on file.

No hats or bandannas are to be worn in the building during the class day. If students must wear a hat to school, the hat must be placed in the locker and left there until the school day is over. Vocational students may take their hat at the time of their departure.

Appropriate clothing should be worn at all times. The main torso of the body should not be visible. Therefore, the wearing of mesh shirts would be inappropriate without and appropriate shirt under the mesh shirt. The wearing of garments considered as tank tops or tops with spaghetti straps is inappropriate.

Any article of clothing or accessories, such as jewelry with spikes, dog collars, wallet chains, chains worn as belts, that may cause injury to another student may not be worn at school or school functions.

Clothing and accessories that display profanity, violence, discriminatory messages or sexually suggestive phrases are not to be worn at school or school functions.

Clothing that displays advertisements for any alcohol, tobacco, or drug product is not to be worn at school or school functions.

Waistband of shorts, slacks, skirts, and similar garments must be worn above the hips. If belts, suspenders, or straps are worn, they must be worn in place and fastened. Undergarments shall not be visible. Any article of clothing that is excessively torn may not be worn.

Shoes must be worn at all times. Shoes with laces should be laced and tied at all times.

Business-style blazers, suit coats, and ties are permitted but outdoor jackets and coats are not to be worn or carried to class.

The legs of trousers and pants shall be worn down at all times.

Hem lengths on dresses, skirts, and shorts must be no higher than mid thigh.

                    ∑ Students who attend R.R. Willis Career Center must observe all safety program dress code    
                  requirements.

Homework Policy

  • Homework assignments should provide additional opportunities for the practice of skills introduced in the classroom.
     

  • Students should be given clear and concise directions for homework assignments.
     

  • All homework should be collected and checked.
     

  • The student should have a clear understanding of how homework becomes a part of his/her total evaluation in the classroom.

  • Student Parking

        The Board of Education permits high school students to drive motor vehicles to and from school. Students may be permitted to drive to the Ralph R. Willis Career/Technical Center by obtaining written permission form their home school. Vehicles driven to school are to be parked in the designated parking area and should not be moved or entered during the school day without permission from the school office. Parking permits must be displayed in the vehicles. These can be obtained from the deanís office. Parking passes are $5.00. Cars without permits will not be allowed on the student lot. Infractions of school rules can result in a studentís parking privileges being revoked. Revocation of privileges to drive to the Ralph R. Willis Center will result in loss of privileges to drive to your home school.  Driving privileges may be revoked due to excessive tardies to school.  A total of  15 unexcused absences will result in a notice to the DMV for driver's license removal.

    Recreational Devices

        Music boxes, laser pointers, cell phones, beepers, pagers, walkmans, cassette, CDs, or disc players and any other item deemed, in the discretion of the principal, to be disruptive to the educational process are not allowed at school.

    Guidance

        Guidance services are available for every student in the school. These services include assistance with educational planning, interpretation of test scores, occupational information, career concerns, or any question the student may feel he/she would like to discuss with the counselor.

    Lockers

        Each student is assigned a hall locker with a combination lock. Students are not to share lockers. Locks are placed on the locker prior to the beginning of school and each student with be charged $2.00 rental per year. Lockers are to be kept locked at all times when not in use. Note: School personnel will hold periodic and random inspections of lockers. Also, if probable cause exists giving school personnel reason to believe that contraband, weapons or other items expressly prohibited from possession on school property are located inside a studentís locker, said locker is subject to search. If illegal material is found charges in a court of law may result.

    Cafeteria

        The school cafeteria is maintained as a vital part of health program of Logan County Schools. To encourage good nutrition, well-balanced meals are offered at a reasonable price. Applications for free and reduced meals may be obtained at your local school.

        Schools will make substitutions in foods for students with a disability, if their disability restricts their diet. Pregnant and young mothers are encouraged to contact the schoolís cafeteria manager concerning nutritional requirements as prescribed by their physician. Any person who believes he or she has been discriminated against in any way should write to:

    Secretary of Agriculture
    Washington, DC 20250

    Alternative School

        An alternative educational program has been established for students who have been expelled from the regular school setting.  This program is held at the Ralph R. Willis Career/Technical School from 3:30 pm- 7:30pm each Monday through Thursday.

        If school is dismissed early or cancelled there will be no school at the Alternative School. The phone number at the Alternative School is 752-4687.

        Medications

        Any type of drug or prescription medicine that a student must take at school must be turned into the office to the person assigned to dispense medicine or to the administration. Prescription medicine must be prescribed by a licensed physician and must have clearly written instructions. Proper forms on all medication given must be filled out and signed by the parent/guardian.

    Tobacco Usage

        The purpose of this policy is to prohibit the use of and distribution of tobacco products in school buildings, on school grounds and at all school functions in order to improve the health of West Virginia students.  Students under the age of 21 shall not possess any tobacco product at any time.  Tobacco product usage has a direct link to numerous health problems and this policy is intended to prevent youth addiction to tobacco products.

        The first violation of this policy will result in contacting parent/legal guardian, provide tobacco prevention education information, 3 days suspension, notify the police and refer to magistrate.

        The second violation of this policy will result in contacting parent/legal guardian, provide tobacco prevention education information, 6 days suspension, notify the police and refer to the magistrate.

        The third violation of this policy will result in contacting the parent/legal guardian, provide tobacco prevention education information, 9 days suspension, notify the police and refer to the magistrate.

    Confidentiality of Records

        Parents/Guardians have the right to inspect their child's records. The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act 1974 provides that personal information (pupil records) will be kept confidential and will not be made available  to others without written consent of the Parents/Guardians of the student.

        Student Education Records will be forwarded by mail to a school in which a student seeks or intends to enroll.

        No information will be discussed on the phone concerning students and personnel.

    Student Records

        Students and parents have a right to inspect and review the educational records of a student.  Student records are confidential except that information covered under directory information. Directory information includes a student's name, address, telephone listing, date and place of birth, major field of study, participation in officially recognized activities and sports, weight and height of  members of athletic teams, dates of attendance, degrees and awards received and the most recent educational agency by the student.

    Grading Scale

    93-100= A  

    85-92= B

    75-84= C

    65-74= D

    0-64= F

    Absences for School Activities

        If a student is to be excused for any school related activity, the sponsors of these activities should report names of students in advance to the school office and deans.  Students absent for school activities are also responsible for  clearing absences with their respective teachers and arranging for make up work in advance.
        Excessive absents from classes even for other school activities is discouraged.  Make up work can seldom take place of actual class participation, and excessive absents consequently must be reflected in grades class assignment make up work per Logan County attendance policy VII. 2 is:

    Days absent    1.    Days to make up work 2
                              2.    Days to make up work 4
                              3.    Days to make-up work 1 school week
    Students with excused or unexcused absences will be allowed to make up their work.

    Parent Communication

    When a student is absent for any reason, a parent should telephone the dean and report the nature of the absence.  Parents may make an appointment for a conference by phoning the school.  Parent-school communication is encouraged at all schools.

    Textbooks

        The school furnishes textbooks to all students.  This is done with the hope that this major investment will be properly safeguarded.  Unreasonable damage to textbooks will result in fines.  Lost textbooks must be paid in full before the teacher can issue another one.

    School Bus Regulations

        Students are under the jurisdiction of the school from the time they leave home until they return home.  The school bus driver is in charge during loading, traveling to the school and from the school, and when unloading.  Any misconduct pertaining to the school bus program may be met with a temporary or permanent suspension form further bus transportation.  Students who need to ride a bus other than the one they are assigned must have a note from their parent and approved by the school administration.  Riding a school bus is a privilege-not a right.

    Fire Drills

        Fire drills at regular intervals are required by law and are an important safety precaution.  It is essential that when the fire signal sounds, everyone promptly clears the building by the prescribed route as quickly and orderly as possible.  If a student pushed the fire alarm fraudulently, he /she will be disciplined according to the Safe Schools Act.

    Telephones

    The office telephone is a business phone and is to be used for emergencies only.

    Who Owns the School?

        Surprisingly YOU do.  Parents and other citizens are legally required to pay taxes that build and maintain the public school system.  Everyone pays taxes in one form or another.  Therefore, any damage done to this building, equipment, desks, buses or books must be paid for with your family's money.  Desks are to sit in.  Desktops serve as a writing surface.  They are not be written on, sat on or defaced in any way.  It is not enough that you should refrain from doing anything to increase this cost to your parents, neighbors, and yourself, but you must help protect the school by discouraging and reporting such activity by others.  Remember most trouble starts as fun.  Students who damage any school property will be held financially responsible for repairs or replacement costs.

    Rights and Responsibilities

        Administrators and teachers of Logan County Schools make every effort to respect and uphold the rights of each student.  Since rights and responsibilities go hand in hand, individuals are expected to fulfill their obligation to accept responsibility.  A Rights and Responsibility Student Handbook from WV Department of Education is available in the main office upon request.

    Assemblies

        Assemblies are not held regularly; however, they are held often enough for students to understand their purpose and enjoy them.  Assemblies are held for the benefit of the students.  Students and staff are to attend all school assemblies.

    School Spirit

        School spirit is more than an outward display of enthusiasm at athletic contests.  School spirit is the sum total of attitudes toward all school endeavors:  Doing the best by giving the most, setting a good example for others to follow, doing that which is best for the school as a whole.  Good school morale is based upon good school citizenship.

    Extra-Curricular Activities

        In order to participate in non-academic extra curricular activities such as interscholastic athletics, cheerleading, student government, class officers, and clubs which are not closely related to identifiable programs of study, a student must maintain at least a 2.00 (C) average.  The student's eligibility will be determined each semester by his/her average for the previous semester.  WVSSAC rules govern high school athletics.  Students receiving home bound instruction are prohibited from participating in extra-curricular activities because they are under a doctor's care.  Courses taken prior to grade 9 are not included in the NCAA Clearinghouse requirements for college athletic eligibility.  Any questions related to college athletic eligibility are to be addressed to the high school counselors.

    After-School Detention

        It is our belief that suspending a child from school for misconduct may help others in the class, but for that child it is basically an unsound educational practice.  It would be a more productive measure if the suspension could be a learning experience for the student.  In keeping with this idea and assessing the suspension data, a After School Detention Program was developed for out high schools.

        After School Detention Programs are held in each of the area high schools from 3:00pm to 6;00pm on Thursdays.  Students/Parents will have the option of attending After School Detention in lieu of out-of-school-suspension for the violation of WV Student Code of Conduct.

        If school is cancelled or dismissed early on an after-school detention day the detention is automatically cancelled.  A detention schedule will be provided at each school.  Students electing after school detention instead of out-of-school suspension may not participate in extra-curricular activities until that day's detention is completed.

    Transportation home following After-School Detention is the responsibility of the student/parent.

    Required Credits

    West Virginia State Graduation Requirements

    Class of 2012 & 2013

    Note:  Graduation requirements may vary by county.  Students must meet these minimal graduation requirements, but county requirements can exceed these.  Check with your school counselor or advisor to get specific graduation requirements for your school.

    What Are Career Pathways And Why Are They Important?

        Career Pathways act as a personal GPS system for individuals to find their way to gainful employment and a successful career. Americaís economy has shifted from an

    industrial model to an information-technology model. The shift created a significant increase in high-skilled occupations and a major decline in low skill jobs. Because

    todayís workplace needs are more defined, todayís job seeker cannot rely on a generalist approach to their future career. Individuals seeking gainful employment

    need to possess a high level of career knowledge so they can make informed decisions when choosing a career direction.

    The Career Pathways illustrated in this publication focus on a 2+2 (high school to community college) time-shortened, cost-saving plan to specific occupations. Please

    keep in mind that a third +2 (four year college) can always be added to the individual Career Pathways.

    Core Requirements (18 credits)

    Reading and English Language Arts

    4 credits

    English 9, 10, 11, 12

    Mathematics1

    4 credits

    Science2

     

    3 credits

    Physical Science

    Biology or Conceptual Biology

    Chemistry or  Conceptual Chemistry or Life Science or Earth Science (effective with 9th
    grade students entering in 2008-09 and 2009-10 only)
     

    Social Studies3

    4 credits

    World Studies to 1900

    United States Studies to 1900

    Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries Studies

    Civics for the 21st Century
     

    Physical Education   

    1 credit

    Health                        

    1 credit

    The Arts5                   

    1 credit

    Electives                                

    2 credits

    The remaining graduation requirements are to be electives.

     

    Career Concentration Courses (4 Credits)4

     

    Professional Pathway

     

    Skilled Pathway

     

     Science - 4th credit (which must be above Physical Science)

     Foreign Language - 2 credits in one language

     Concentration Ė 1 additional elective credit required

     Concentration - 4 additional credits required related to the selected career concentration

     

     

    1.  It is the intent that students in the professional pathway will take mathematics annually, but must take at least three mathematics classes in grades 9-12.   The recommended course sequence, which may include college courses, AP courses or virtual school courses, for students in the professional pathway is Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, Trigonometry, and Pre-Calculus.  The mathematics courses selected for credit must be relevant to the studentís concentration.  Students in the professional pathway and college bound students in the skilled pathway, who do not achieve the State assessment College readiness benchmark for mathematics, shall be required to take a college transition mathematics course during their senior year. 
     It is also the intent that students in the skilled pathway will take mathematics annually, but must take at least three mathematics classes in grades 9-12.  The recommended course sequence in the skilled pathway is Algebra I, geometry, conceptual mathematics, college transition mathematics or Algebra II. College Transition Mathematics must be offered
    annually and will be counted as a mathematics credit.
     Because of the extreme importance of mastery of the Algebra I content standards and objectives (CSOs), students who need additional time to master Algebra I CSOs may be identified at the local level using a data-based decision making process. Students who need additional time for Algebra I CSO mastery should complete the recommended math course sequence at a pace that is consistent with their ability levels.  While research indicates the best option for scheduling additional time is to do so within the same year, scheduling options such as ďdouble blockingĒ Algebra I, Algebra Support and Algebra I, or other similar options may be determined at the local level, as long as the priority of the selected option is to provide students the best possible opportunity to succeed in mastery of the Algebra I CSOs. Counties selecting a scheduling option that places students who need extra time into two separate math courses may grant students up to two math credits toward graduation upon successful course completion.  It is further recommended that students who are in the most need of continuous math instruction be enrolled in at least one math course each year in high school.
    2.  Physical Science, Biology or Conceptual Biology and Chemistry or Conceptual Chemistry shall be taken in consecutive order. Conceptual course credits may not be accepted by four-year higher education institutions.  Life Science or Earth Science may be used in lieu of Chemistry or Conceptual Chemistry to satisfy graduation requirements for students entering 9th grade in 2008-09 and 2009-10.  Life Science includes courses such as Human Anatomy and Physiology or Biology II.  Any science course above Biology meets the requirements for the third science.
    3.
    Students shall take the high school social studies courses in the listed sequence to ensure maximum understanding of the material to be covered and alignment of content and State assessment. World Studies to 1900, United States Studies to 1900, Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries Studies and Civics for the 21st Century shall be taken in consecutive order.  The social studies content standards and objectives are constructed in such a way that information progresses sequentially through time periods and builds the foundation for successful achievement of the complex concepts that follow. The senior course, Civics for the 21st Century, has been written to deliver rich academic content within relevant context for students entering the world of work and college.
    4. 
    The four credits taken by career/technical concentrators must be consistent with those identified for WVDE approved career/technical programs of study.  Each career/technical concentration in a school shall obtain and maintain an appropriate industry-recognized accreditation/certification, when one is available, and shall provide students the opportunity to obtain an industry recognized credential as part of the instructional program.
    5.  Students in Skilled Pathway concentrations that complete state approved career/technical courses that reflect creative and innovative arts content may substitute these courses for the arts credit required for graduation.  Designation of these courses will be made by state-level administrators of career/technical and arts programs.

     The following courses are approved for substitution:

     1851 - Fundamentals of Illustration

    1857 - Fundamentals of Graphic Design

    1861 - Advanced Illustration

    1859 - Advanced Graphic Design

    1431 - Digital Imagining I

    1727 - Drafting Techniques

    0213 - Floriculture 

    Career Development

    Prior to students selecting a concentration and pathway, opportunities for career decision-making must be provided in grades 9-10.

    Experiential Learning

     

    All students must participate in an experiential learning experience at some time in grades 9-12.  If credit is granted for these experiences, content standards and objectives will be developed and approved at the local level.  (See Section 5.6.5)

    Technology

    Students in grades 9-12 shall be provided integrated opportunities within the core requirements to master the standards for Policy 2520.14.  It is recommended that all students take at least one course in technology applications during grades 9-12.  It is also recommended that all students complete an online learning experience during grade 9-12.

    Senior Year

    All West Virginia High School students shall be fully enrolled in a full day of high school and/or college credit bearing courses. It is recommended that students complete a senior project to add rigor and relevance to the senior year. 

    West Virginia State Graduation Requirements

    Class of 2014

    Note:  Graduation requirements may vary by county.  Students must meet these minimal graduation requirements, but county requirements can exceed these.  Check with your school counselor or advisor to get specific graduation requirements for your school.

    Core Requirements (18 credits)

    Reading and English Language Arts

    4 credits

    English 9, 10, 11, 12

    Mathematics1

    4 credits

    Science2

     

    3 credits

    Physical Science

    Biology or Conceptual Biology

    Chemistry or  Conceptual Chemistry

    Physics

    Social Studies3

    4 credits

    World Studies to 1900

    United States Studies to 1900

    Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries Studies

    Civics for the 21st Century

    Physical Education

    1 credit

    Health

    1 credit

    The Arts5

    1 credit

    Electives

    2 credits

    The remaining graduation requirements are to be electives.

     

    Career Concentration Courses (4 Credits)4

     

    Professional Pathway

     

    Skilled Pathway

     

     

    Science - 4th credit (which must be above Physical Science)

     

    Foreign Language - 2 credits in one language

     

    Concentration Ė 1 additional credit required related to the selected career concentration

     

    Concentration - 4 additional credits required related to the selected career concentration

     

     

    Career Development

    Prior to students selecting a concentration and pathway, opportunities for career decision-making must be provided in grades 9-10.

    Experiential Learning

     

    All students must participate in an experiential learning experience at some time in grades 9-12.  If credit is granted for these experiences, content standards and objectives will be developed and approved at the local level.  (See Section 5.6.5)

    Technology

    Students in grades 9-12 shall be provided integrated opportunities within the core requirements to master the standards for Policy 2520.14.  It is recommended that all students take at least one course in technology applications during grades 9-12.  It is also recommended that all students complete an online learning experience during grade 9-12.

    Senior Year

    All West Virginia high school students shall be fully enrolled in a full day of high school and/or college credit bearing courses. It is recommended that students complete a senior project to add rigor and relevance to the senior year. 

     1.  It is the intent that students in the professional pathway will take mathematics annually, but must take at least three mathematics classes in grades 9-12.   The recommended course sequence, which may include college courses, AP courses or virtual school courses, for students in the professional pathway is Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, Trigonometry, and Pre-Calculus.  The mathematics courses selected for credit must be relevant to the studentís concentration.  Students in the professional pathway and college bound students in the skilled pathway, who do not achieve the State assessment College readiness benchmark for mathematics, shall be required to take a college transition mathematics course during their senior year. 

     It is also the intent that students in the skilled pathway will take mathematics annually, but must take at least three mathematics classes in grades 9-12.  The recommended course sequence in the skilled pathway is Algebra I, geometry, conceptual mathematics, college transition mathematics or Algebra II. College Transition Mathematics must be offered annually and will be counted as a mathematics credit.

     Because of the extreme importance of mastery of the Algebra I content standards and objectives (CSOs), students who need additional time to master Algebra I CSOs may be identified at the local level using a data-based decision making process. Students who need additional time for Algebra I CSO mastery should complete the recommended math course sequence at a pace that is consistent with their ability levels.  While research indicates the best option for scheduling additional time is to do so within the same year, scheduling options such as ďdouble blockingĒ Algebra I, Algebra Support and Algebra I, or other similar options may be determined at the local level, as long as the priority of the selected option is to provide students the best possible opportunity to succeed in mastery of the Algebra I CSOs. Counties selecting a scheduling option that places students who need extra time into two separate math courses may grant students up to two math credits toward graduation upon successful course completion.  It is further recommended that students who are in the most need of continuous math instruction be enrolled in at least one math course each year in high school. 

    2.  Physical Science, Biology or Conceptual Biology and Chemistry or Conceptual Chemistry shall be taken in consecutive order. Conceptual course credits may not be accepted by four-year higher education institutions.  Life Science or Earth Science may be used in lieu of Chemistry or Conceptual Chemistry to satisfy graduation requirements for students entering 9th grade in 2008-09 and 2009-10.  Life Science includes courses such as Human Anatomy and Physiology or Biology II.  Any science course above Biology meets the requirements for the third science. 

    3. Students shall take the high school social studies courses in the listed sequence to ensure maximum understanding of the material to be covered and alignment of content and State assessment. World Studies to 1900, United States Studies to 1900, Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries Studies and Civics for the 21st Century shall be taken in consecutive order.  The social studies content standards and objectives are constructed in such a way that information progresses sequentially through time periods and builds the foundation for successful achievement of the complex concepts that follow. The senior course, Civics for the 21st Century, has been written to deliver rich academic content within relevant context for students entering the world of work and college.

     4.  The four credits taken by career/technical concentrators must be consistent with those identified for WVDE approved career/technical programs of study.  Each career/technical concentration in a school shall obtain and maintain an appropriate industry-recognized accreditation/certification, when one is available, and shall provide students the opportunity to obtain an industry recognized credential as part of the instructional program.
    5.  Students in Skilled Pathway concentrations that complete state approved career/technical courses that reflect creative and innovative arts content may substitute these courses for the arts credit required for graduation.  Designation of these courses will be made by state-level administrators of career/technical and arts programs.

    The following courses are approved for substitution:

     1851 - Fundamentals of Illustration

    1857 - Fundamentals of Graphic Design

    1861 - Advanced Illustration

    1859 - Advanced Graphic Design

    1431 - Digital Imagining I

    1727 - Drafting Techniques

    0213 - Floriculture

    To find more information go to http://wvde.state.wv.us/careerpathways/

    Selection of Honor Graduates

    Per Logan County Policy VII.14- All grades received for courses taken for high school credit will be used to calculate a student's GPA.  Grade point averages will be round to the nearest 1/1000,000.  No audit classes/grades will be used to calculate a student's GPA.  Honor graduate positions will be determine at the conclusion of the first semester of the senior year.  Honor graduate positions are as follows:

    3.00-3.49    Cum Laude - High Honor

    3.50-3.99    Magna Cum Laude - Great Honor

    4.00- Above    Summa Cum Laude - Highest Honor

    Safe School Helpline

        The Logan County Board of Education will participate in the Governor's Safe School hotline in cooperation with the Safe and Drug Free Schools Program. This program provides a seven day a week, twenty-four hours a day phone line for any student who needs to speak with a responsible adult.  The caller can give their name or be anonymous and they can receive advice or help. The Superintendent of Schools will be notified if the caller asks for additional help or if the caller information needs further investigation.

       The Safe School Helpline Number is

    1-800-SAFEWVA

    Student Code of Conduct

        The Logan County Board of Education recognizes the need for a safe, orderly, stimulating environment conducive to learning. In order to achieve these conditions, the Logan County Board of Education also acknowledges the need for promoting effective discipline in the school through a comprehensive program. This program must involve the school, the parents, and the community. In order to provide the schools with the authority to achieve these needs, the Logan County Board of Education provides the Student Code of Conduct.

        This code of conduct applies to all students enrolled in Logan County. This policy does not supersede any rights granted to special education students by Federal or State law or other State Board of Education policy.

        In order for every student to have the opportunity to reach his/her potential, every student in the public schools of West Virginia shall:

  • Students will help create an atmosphere free from bullying, intimidation, and harassment.

  • Students will demonstrate honesty and trustworthiness.

  • Students will treat other with respect, deal peacefully with anger, use good manners, and be considerate of the feelings of others.

  • Students will demonstrate responsibility, use self-control, and be self-disciplined.

  • Students will demonstrate fairness, play by the rules, and will not take advantage of others.

  • Students will demonstrate compassion and caring.

  • Students will demonstrate good citizenship by obeying laws and rules, respecting authority, and by cooperating with others.

    • Student Discipline Procedures

        Decisions on disciplinary action are determined by the principal at the school level, certain offenses are to be referred to the Superintendentís office for consideration by the Board of Education.

    The following standard procedures are recommended:

    Level 1 Violations

        Anti-social conduct; cheating/academic misconduct; disorderly conduct; improper operation of a motor vehicle; inappropriate displays of affection; inappropriate dress and grooming; leaving school without permission; possession of inappropriate personal property; tardiness; technology abuse; tobacco; trespassing; truancy.

    School Responses to Level 1 Violations:

        Appropriate intervention strategies (conflict resolution/peer mediation/anger management); administrator/student conference or reprimand; administrator and teacher-parent/guardian conference; referrals and conference to support staff or agencies; referral to a tobacco cessation program; daily/weekly progress reports; behavioral contracts; change in studentís class schedule; school service assignment; confiscation of inappropriate item; restitution/restoration; before and/or after-school activities; immediate exclusion by teacher from one class period of the school day; weekend detention; in-school suspension; out-of-school suspension for up to three days; law enforcement notification.

    Level 2 Violations:

        Bullying/harassment/intimidation; failure to serve assigned detention; false identification; forgery; fraud; gambling; gang activity; insubordination/unruly conduct; loitering; theft or possession of stolen property; reprisal or retaliation against persons who report or testifies in any investigation; falsely reporting violations of the Student Code of Conduct; engaging in sexually explicit behavior; violation of school bus rules.

    School Responses to Level 2 Violations:

    Any Level 1 response; out-of-school suspension for up to ten days

    Level 3 Violations:

        Alcohol; Defacing school property; disobeying a teacher in a willful manner; hazing; improper or negligent operation of a motor vehicle; marijuana (simple possession); physical altercation; profane language; theft; threat of injury or injury; drugs; instruments, devices, or noxious substances; habitual violation of school rules or polices; inciting a false emergency.

    School Responses to Level 3 Violations:

    Suspension from school or transportation; possible expulsion; school responses to level 1 and level 2; agency notification (i.e. DHHR)

    Level 4 Violations:

    Battery on a school employee; felony; possession of a controlled substance; possession of a firearm or deadly weapon; sale of a narcotic drug.

    School/County Responses to Level 4 Violations:

    Mandatory suspension; possible expulsion

    A copy of the complete Logan County Student Code of Conduct Policy may be obtained through the Principalís office of your school.

    Attendance Policy

        WVC (18-8-1) compulsory school attendance is a state law and must be enforced. Parents, guardians, or custodians of students are responsible for their attendance until the age of 18. Absence is not being present in the school building.

        Attendance referral system -1.) After 5 unexcused absences a legal notice is sent to the parent, which requires a conference with the principal. 2.) After 10 unexcused absences a petition will be filed in juvenile court. WVC (18-8-2) Any person who shall fail to cause a child in that personís care to attend school shall upon conviction be fined not less than $50 nor more than $100 together with the cost of prosecution or confined in jail not less than 5 nor more than 20 days. *A complete copy of the attendance policy is available in the Principalís Office of your school.

    School Policy on Violence

    Purpose of the Policy

        To give students, parents, staff, and the community at large a clear statement concerning the school district's stand against violent behavior and the consequences that will follow violation of the policy.

    • To ensure the safety of students and their staff, their property, and the property of the school.

  • To maintain a safe, supportive, nurturing, non-punitive school environment highly conducive to learning.

  • Definition of Violence

        Violence occurs whenever anyone harms--or threatens to harm--a person's body, feelings, or possessions.

    Statement of Policy

        No one is entitled to be violent. No form of violence will be tolerated from anybody at school, on school-sponsored transportation, or at school activities away from school.

    Physical Violence:

        Any act that does harm to person or property by means of physical action.  Physical violence against another person is any act that does not bodily harm or that disregards potential harm.  Physical violence against property is any act that damages, or that disregards potential damage to, public or private property, whatever its monetary value.

    Social Violence:

        Social behavior that hurts a person is violent.  Much of it is a variety of ostracism:  forced exclusion, treating a person as another or as one who doesn't exist.

    Verbal Violence:

        Verbal means more than oral, or spoken.  It includes any expression through words, written or uttered.

    Visual Violence:

        Visual violence overlaps physical, social, and verbal violence.  The perpetrator wants the recipient to see--and feel intimidated by--the action.

    Medication:

        Any type of drug  or prescription medicine that a student must take at school must be turned into the office to the person assigned to dispense medicine or to the administration. Prescription medicine must be prescribed by a license physician and must have clearly written instructions. Proper forms on all medication given must be filled out and signed by the parent/guardian.

     

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